Vision Therapy

Image of doctor using laser equipment for eye surgery.

Vision Therapy

The human visual system is complex. The problems that can develop in our visual system require a variety of treatment options. Many visual conditions can be treated effectively with spectacles or contact lenses alone; however, some are most effectively treated with vision therapy.

Vision therapy is a sequence of activities individually prescribed and monitored by the doctor to develop efficient visual skills and processing. It is prescribed after a comprehensive eye examination has been performed and has indicated that vision therapy is an appropriate treatment option. The vision therapy program is based on the results of standardized tests, the needs of the patient, and the patient’s signs and symptoms. The use of lenses, prisms, filters, occluders, specialized instruments, and computer programs is an integral part of vision therapy.

Vision therapy is administered in the office under the guidance of Dr. Joseph J. Pirman. It requires a number of office visits and depending on the severity of the diagnosed conditions, the length of the program typically ranges from several weeks to several months. Activities paralleling in-office techniques are typically taught to the patient to be practiced at home to reinforce the developing visual skills.

Research has demonstrated vision therapy can be an effective treatment option for:

  • Ocular motility dysfunctions (eye movement disorders)
  • Non-strabismic binocular disorders (inefficient eye teaming)
  • Strabismus (misalignment of the eyes)
  • Amblyopia (poorly developed vision)
  • Accommodative disorders (focusing problems)
  • Visual information processing disorders, including visual-motor integration and integration with other sensory modalities

Some signs and symptoms that may indicate poor eye coordination include double vision, headaches, eye and body fatigue, irritability, dizziness and difficulty in reading and concentrating. Children may also display characteristics that may indicate poor eye coordination including covering one eye, skipping lines or losing their place while reading, poor sports performance, avoiding tasks that require close work and tiring easily.

Because poor eye coordination can be difficult to detect, periodic optometric examinations, beginning at age 6 months and again at age 3 years are recommended. A comprehensive examination by a doctor of optometry can determine the extent, if any, of poor eye coordination. Poor eye coordination is often successfully treated with eyeglasses and/or vision therapy. The success rate for achieving proper eye coordination is quite high.

Watch a video on how Vision Therapy works.

Schedule your eye exam with Dr.Pirman today.

Content courtesy of AOA.org