Botox – A Mini-Face Lift in a Syringe

Image of woman looking in mirror

Botox – A Mini-Face Lift in a Syringe

What Is BOTOX® Cosmetic?
BOTOX® Cosmetic is a prescription medicine that is injected into muscles and used to improve the look of moderate-to- severe frown lines between the brows in people 18 to 65 years of age for a short period of time (temporary).

BOTOX® Cosmetic is administered by
a healthcare professional as a simple, nonsurgical treatment that is injected directly into the muscles between the brows. It works by blocking nerve impulses to the injected muscles. This reduces muscle activity that causes moderate to severe lines to form between the brows.

Image of woman have botox injection to forehead.

BOTOX® Cosmetic is certainly not just for women. If you are a man and think it’s time to do something about those moderate to severe glabellar lines between your brows, talk to your doctor about whether BOTOX® Cosmetic is right for you.

  • 6% of total BOTOX® Cosmetic procedures are performed on males (313,714 procedures)1
  • BOTOX® Cosmetic is the most popular minimally invasive physician administered aesthetic procedure for males (314,000 procedures)2
Image of man having Botox injection to forehead.

Before and After

Take some time to review our Before and After photos of Patients who have had BOTOX® Cosmetic injections. In some cases, you will notice there have been similiar results to a mini-face lift.

Contact us to learn more about our Botox and cosmetic surgery services.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION INCLUDING BOXED WARNING Distant Spread of Toxin Effect Postmarketing reports indicate that the effects of BOTOX® Cosmetic and all botulinum toxin products may spread from the area of injection to produce symptoms consistent with botulinum toxin effects. These may include asthenia, generalized muscle weakness, diplopia, blurred vision, ptosis, dysphagia, dysphonia, dysarthria, urinary incontinence, and breathing difficulties. These symptoms have been reported hours to weeks after injection. Swallowing and breathing difficulties can be life threatening, and there have been reports of death. The risk of symptoms is probably greatest in children treated for spasticity, but symptoms can also occur in adults treated for spasticity and other conditions, particularly in those patients who have underlying conditions that would predispose them to these symptoms. In unapproved uses, including spasticity in children and adults, and in approved indications, cases of spread of effect have occurred at doses comparable to those used to treat cervical dystonia and at lower doses.